Riky Bains

Life Stories

Little cute Indian girl doing her studies.

Riky Bains

  • AiB
  • October 11, 2016
  1. Where did you grow up and study?

    I grew up in Dartford, Kent and still live there. I had the pleasure of studying at Dartford Grammar School before progressing to higher education at Royal Holloway University of London in Egham, Surrey.


  2. What were your family values instilled at an early age and what did you learn from your parents?

    My parents worked horrendous ungodly hours with a ferocious, unrelenting consistency and this instilled in me a rigorous work ethic from a young age. I understood the importance of education and learned the value of advancing through learning. I think I caught the independent, entrepreneurial bug from my father who ran his own businesses throughout my life.


  3. What was your life like whilst growing up?

    I grew up loving books and studying things while my peers would prefer to play. Literature was an escape into the unknown where I would commence my own adventures from my head, free from the prying eyes of the outside world. My first love was football and I quickly became an avid fan of Chelsea FC and my local club Dartford FC – putting much effort into following them around the country.


  4. What is your current job?…if it’s your own business, did you spot gap in the market?…what have you learnt from this experience?

    I am a full-time copy writer and often say that I run a small digital marketing firm because my clients benefit from my network of skilled contacts too. I have been writing for nearly 9 years as a hobby; having started as a blogger for music magazines but it wasn’t until March 2015 when I decided to follow my passion fully. I left a sales career and haven’t looked back since.


  5. Which direction or path do you want your career/job to take

    My goal is simply to be able to travel and work with financial freedom allowing me to live comfortably wherever I am. I want to go in the direction of publishing books and public speaking – passing on my thoughts and message in the form of legacy is very important to me.


  6. What advice would you give to startups, young people studying or leaving University?

    My advice to university students is to just try things while you are at university because you have that academic net to fall back on if things go wrong. The best experience is experience – opt in for opportunities, don’t ignore your curiosity. To start-ups, I would say don’t underestimate the power of networking – a solid foundation of people is a powerful asset.


  7. Can you give us a closing comment for this interview?

    Take the risk of thinking for yourself , much more happiness , truth, beauty, and wisdom will come to you that way

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